Monday, August 12, 2013

Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Favorite Non-Fiction Books

It's time again to participate in The Broke and The Bookish's Top Ten Tuesday.

The week's theme: Top Ten Favorite Books With a X Setting (i.e.: futuristic world, set mostly in schools, during World War II, books set in California  etc. etc. So many possibilities!)

I decided that my approach would be book set in reality; aka my favorite Non-Fictions!

1. Playing the Enemy by John Carlin: I grew up knowing very little about Nelson Mandela. I remember first reading about South Africa and apartheid and I remember thinking "I was in school when this happened.  Why didn't I ever hear about this?" I still wonder that often, but am very glad I have since remedied this error.  If you have never read this book, I can not recommend it enough.  It was fascinating.


2. The Innocent Man by John Grisham: I actually picked this book up at the library without reading the back. It was the only John Grisham audiobook they had and I am a huge fan.  It's all about a man who is wrongly convicted of a crime on basically no evidence. I had no idea until I was almost done that the book was a non-fiction. It was very eye-opening.

3. The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson : If you read my blog enough, you know I have a small thing for serial killers. They fascinate me in that they can seem so very normal and upstanding, yet be filled with such evil. This book does not disappoint.


4. Stiff by Mary Roach:  Many people ask the question what happens to your soul after you die, but did you ever wonder what happens to your body?  Read this book and you won't need to wonder. This book will either convince you to donate your body to science or completely gross you out.


5. 1776 by David McCullough: I think every American should read this book. It helps you appreciate more how we got where we are today.


6. In Cold Blood by Truman Capote: Is In Cold Blood the best true crime book ever written?  No. So why do I list it?  It was the first. Thanks Capote for a new genre that I personally love!


7. Moneyball by Michael Lewis: Again, if you have read my blog for long than you know I love baseball. Moneyball is all about the Oakland A's and their manager Billy Beane. What's so impressive about them?  They win. Big deal right?  Well, they do it with a fraction of the money that other teams do. 


8.  Bonk by Mary Roach: Ok....so this one was more of a guilty pleasure but I figured I throw it on the list because I did enjoy the book. Its all about the science of sex. After reading this book, you'll be an expert about what EXACTLY happens during the dirty deed. Its fascinating!


9. The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank: I read this book as a kid, which I think is the perfect age to read it. If you really want to understand what happened during the Holocaust as a kid, what better perspective than a child? 

10. Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom: Looking to get a refresher on life?  This book helps you wipe your eyes a little and see a bit clearer.
 I hope you enjoyed my list and perhaps found a book you might be interested in. :)

20 comments:

  1. Great list! Those are some interesting titles...I really should branch out in non-fiction (I only read non-fiction from certain themes, mainly history and travel).

    My TTT

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    1. I like non-fiction but its really hit or miss. Some I love, some are really boring. Thanks for stopping by!

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  2. Great list, I very rarely read non-fiction but I have read three on your list, obviously including Anne Frank which remains one of my favorite books years later.

    Thanks for stopping by my blog :)

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    1. Thanks! Anne Frank is a phenomenal book.

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  3. I don't read a lot of non-fiction and when I do, I basically want it to read like fiction. The Grisham book might be a good place to start for me, then. I don't love Grisham's writing, but this one does sound fascinating. Thanks for the rec!

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    1. The Devil in the White City is very novel like as well, if you like that.

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  4. Good old The Devil in the White City. Being from Chicago, I hear about that one a lot, haha. Great read though.

    My TTT.

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    1. After reading the book, I really wanted to come visit!

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  5. I'm so glad to have found a Non-Fiction list! Tuesdays with Morrie is one of my all time favourite books. Have you seen the movie? I recommend that one as well :). Thank you for stopping by my blog!

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    1. I have not seen the movie, but now I want to! I didn't even know there was one.

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  6. Great topic! I used to read almost all non-fiction, but now I barely read any, I don't know how that happened. I really liked The Devil in the White City and I remember a friend reading Stiff a few years ago and thinking I needed to pick it up. And of course Bonk sounds pretty fascinating. Thanks for giving me some new non-fiction ideas! And thanks for stopping by my TTT post earlier!

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    1. I go through phases. Non-fiction, fiction, and back and forth.

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  7. 1776 is a book I'd really like to read sometime. I used to think that Revolutionary War history was boring, but now I'm finding it a lot more fascinating, but have failed to really read up on the subject. Good topic for TTT! Thanks for stopping by my blog!

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    1. I am totally the same way. I thought it was boring.

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  8. In Cold Blood is one of the best true crime books I've ever read - excellent choice.

    Stiff also looks good but I'm not sure I want to know. Some things are better left to the imagination.

    Thanks for stopping by The Hottie Harem.

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    1. Stiff is definitely not for those with weak stomachs. Ha ha ha. Thanks!

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  9. Great list! I love In Cold Blood and Anne Frank, and have both of the Mary Roach's on my to-read shelf.

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  10. Great list, I didn't know John Grisham did non-fiction.

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    1. I was surprised too, especially since it reads like a novel.

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